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liabilitys of the medicare and social security systems, the position of the united states verges on bankruptcy. because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. that's something that seems to me one can't likely dismiss. >> rose: a program note. we intended to show you this evening interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and job john grisham but because of the economic story, we will show you those interviews at a later time. tonight, orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: peter orszag is here, he is the director of the office of management and budget. called more than just the budget director by the "new yorker" magazine, he's deeply involved in president obama's ambitious domestic agenda as well. that includes health care, energy policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal health. the administration recently released projections showing deficits growing by $9 trillion over the next ten years. sp
of the united states verges on bankruptc because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. at's something that sms to me one c't likel dismiss. >> ros a program note. we iended to show you this eving interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and jojohn grism but because of theconomic story, w will show you those interviews at a later time. tonigh orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioningponsored by se communications om our studios in new york city, this is chlie rose. >> ros peter orszag is here, he ithe director of the oice ofanagement and budget. called more than just the budget rector by the "new yorker" magazine, he' deeply invved in psident obama's ambitious dostic agenda as well. that includes healt care, ener policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal healt the ministration rently released pjections showing defici growing by $9 trillio over the nex ten years. speaking at new york uversity earlier today, peter orszag sai the government is permitted to putting the cntry back on firm fiscal footi. i'm pleased
who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
. that is what happened in the united states and what is happening in europe and what is happening in asia. i think at one time we could have another bubble and as bubble is going to be bigger from the other. the united states, now the cost of financing their debt is about $50 billion a year. looking at $900 billion in 2020. obviously the problem of that accelerating and putting investors at risk. in dubai we have a big bubble and i think abu dhabi has to put the burden of correcting a miscalculation. >> professor, what do you think is abu dhabi's position. it is not entirely clear whether they will underwrite the whole thing or pick and choose which of the debts they are going to deal with. >> obviously -- they say they cannot -- they probablyavto put first of all a new regulation a new role and they have to tighten the belt. they cannot just bail out and then go into another problem. but so far, the central banker of dubai -- liquidity, but they said they have to pick and choose. they don't have to reschedule all of that but they have to schedule some of that. this is going to be a new equa
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
for abbas. >> translator: the stated position of the united states in relation to settlements in the annexation of jerusalem have been well-known and appreciated by us. however, we were surprised by their favoring of the israeli position. >> reporter: but obama's been talking up a possible breakthrough in middle east peace going back before his cairo speech. palestinians fear obama won't be able to encourage israel to make the other compromises necessary to complete a final peace deal. a leading palestinian candidate to fill abbas' shoes put it this way -- >> i think this announcement is a declaration of the failure of efforts for true peace process, due to the israeli policy of expanding and continuing settlements and the failure of the united states to take an impartial position. >> reporter: now abbas has had enou and said he won't stand for re-election. it remains to be seen if the u.s. moves to try to keep him or prefers to look to the future withnother palestinian head of state, in the early part of next year. john tarat, al jazeera, washington. >> for more on the middle
missions to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, and attempted murder in los angeles and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "our of the night," in 1941, when eventually appears. immediately it had the following effect on him: krebbs became one of the editors and contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california and at that point he determined to become a writer. he got all of san quentin in 1929, was deported, went back to europe and got caught up again and communist activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis from which he escaped by the following routt: he converted to nazism, the nazis let him out so he could go out and be as it were a double agent for his former communist allies. they, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his -- about his conversion. and under these circumstances, he said he chased by the secret police, both of russia and of germany. he took off wi
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
of denmark, the president of the united states, and some discussions with the chinese president, we have the capacity to lead an agreement at copenhagen. one which deals with the corps policy challenges for the future. namely, what temperature increase are we prepared to sustain in the future? what targets do we need from the major developed economies around the world? what commitment to action do we needrom the major emerging economies like china and india? how do we found this agreement? what kind of climate change process to put in place? if we can land and an outcome of those areas, we will have made a large step forward. and then translating that into legalese will take longer. >> talking about a long by the agreement is not possible? >> will we are talking about is what i would describe as an operational framework agreement. what president obama said the other day, one which would take immediate effect. there's a separation between what is said in a policy agreement, and the difficulty and complexity of translating that into a 4000 page binding legal document. you cannot get to the
that there are 200 million jews and the world and israel is half the size of europe. it is not. the united states and canada are roughly 400 times each the size of israel. the arab world is 500 times the size of israel. egypt alone is roughly the 40 times the size of israel. and even a small country like jordan, our neighbor to the east, is almost four times as big. israel is bigger than rhode island. [laughter] that is about it. [laughter] now, mind you, small countries are not necessarily insecure. belgium and luxembourg are small, but today they are not insecure. if their neighbors included radical regimes bent on their conquest, bent on their destruction, it they fell the -- if they feel that terror proxy's that fire thousands of missiles on their population, believe me, they too would feel insecure. anybody would. because of our small size and the radical and violent neighborhood in which we live, israel faces security threats like that of no other nation. here are two facts from recent days alone that will drive this point home. a few days ago, the israeli navy it predicted that the ship ca
of the united states, peace can become a reality. [applause] we can surprise a skeptical world. achieving peace is a great challenge facing israel. at the un in september, i spoke of another great challenge. preventing iran from developing a nuclear weapons capability. the iranian regime tyrannizes its people, sponsors and supplies terrorists and openly pledges to wipe israel off the map. just imagine how much more dangerous this regime would be it had atomic bombs. the responsible members of the international community must unite to prevent this grave threat to the pace of the entire world. i support president obama's continued efforts towards these ends. i appreciate the firm position taken by the leading european governments. we must not succumb to the iranian regime's cutting into its to see. we must stand together to stop tehran from realizing its nuclear ambitions. in addition to achieving peace, and to preventing a nuclear iran, there is a third momentous challenge before us. reducing the world's dependence on oil. this would help cleanse our world after more than a century of industrial
into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in their talks, obama and the prime minister addressed biggest sore spot in u.s./japan relations -- the presence of an air base on okinawa. many japanese are demanding that the base be closed, with protests takin place prior to obama's visit. after today's talks the two lea
later, after the pentagon papers, erwin griswold, the solicitor general of the united states, who argued the pentagon papers case on behalf of the nixon administration, wrote a story for "the washington post" saying that in fact there was no national security issues whatsoever, and that he as a lawyer had to use every bit of ingenuity and creativity to even make an arguable case pits if anyone wants to read that, i am sure the attorneys in this room would. "the washington post, irwin griswald. you can check out on nexis lexus. no national security issues of all. >> pennsylvania is an elected state at the federal level, as far as appointments. but every once in awhile, it gets played out as to whether pennsylvania should go to some combination -- excuse me -- appointed intellect. i'm going to ask and academic, john, to talk first about that topic. where do you think it should wind up? should it stay the way it is? judges close to home like county judges, are they electable in the sense that people know that? where is it if you go statewide -- or is it if you go statewide? >> at the local
.s. secretary of state, secretary of war, and finally, to term president of the united states, the fifth president. as governor of virginia he became the second most powerful figure in america. virginia then was america's largest, wealthiest and heavily populated state with 20% of the american population. it stretched all the way to the mississippi river and all the way north to the great lakes. it was enormous and the prestige and its importance of the governor was akin to the governors of california, illinois, new york and texas put together. and monroe was not only governor of america's most important state, he was a national hero in the revolutionary war. in other words he was a giant in his day and i don't understand why historians ignore him which is why i wrote this book to restore him to his rightful place in american history as the most important president in the early days of the nation. now some historians elevate john adams to historical prominence and most historians deify thomas jefferson and james madison and these were three great founding fathers and great political phil
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
of the reasons that have been worried is the united states's focus on pakistan and the anti-terrorist strategy. they could say it was in the interest to focus on pakistan. >> shore. if you think of the region, as it was until recently, including islamabad, this is part of a spectrum. how much will to separate this, i'd think it is better to focus on the way it on how to bring india in and bring more cooperation begun to stabilize the whole region together. the net think the discussions and the two sides will have an understanding of how to proceed. >> just to look at money in business, with this relationship, a lot of it has to do with profit and economics. the nuclear deal to do a great deal to create jobs on both sides. >> absolutely. i think that once that is done reactors will be sold, but also, they will make the pitch for liberalizing the technology. i think once we open the door as well, there will be huge advances in trade, which has been growing quite fast and is quite balanced unlike in the case of india and china. the trade is more balanced. there is a big move to come into the unit
ago, this image would have been unimaginable. the president of the united states in the same room at the same time as a member of the burmese military government. a sign the new policy of engagement with the region in general. an opportunity for barack obama to call for the release ofhe democracy leader in burmese. that demand was not reflected in the initial statement of the meeting. >> during our meeting we talked about how, we can work together as close partners both within this region and throughout the world. we discussed the importance of meeting, and challenges like climate change, nuclear proliferation, and working to support the g-20 efforts to promote a balance for the economic recovery. >> president obama went to singapore late and is making up for lost time. had a meeting with his russian counterparts. the main reason for him being here was a summit with asia- pacific leaders. boosting free trade was a purpose. a pessimistic message oa new day of climate change played to the headlines. >> the go binding treaty signing may not happen. pressed a bold statement from a gro
. he charged the united states with backtracking onts middle east policy and refusing to press israel to freeze selement building in the west bank. >>> more tnight on that ship carrying hundreds of tons of weapons that were ized off the coasof cyprus. israel claims the wpons were from in and were heed to hezbollah ghters in lebanon. today, isrli prime minister njamin netanyahu claimed tha iran's goal was to kill as man civilian as possible. for its part, hezbollah deni any connectionith the weapons. >>> weurn now to africa and a story that impressed us with its insights into at is going on somalia. we have reported the very tenuous political situation there, a weak government backed by the united states d an incrsingly violent islamic rebel movement, known as al sh what you are aut to ee will put the threat of those extremists in perspectiv and willhow why we all needo pay attention to somalia. in ra visit by western journalist, martin geisl went to the town of bos so noh of the capitagadishu. >> ts is a publichow of forcby al shabaab. these pictures filmed in the past f dys in mogi
ill. the objective that we should face in the united states is how to provide information to individuals and physicians so that they can make fully informed decisions about the kinds of care that they want to have. a system such as great britain's where expenditures are a small fraction of what we spend here need to face those kinds of questions. we are light-years away from having to confront that sort of question here in the united states. >> we only have a few seconds left, but there's more to this than just economics. there's a moral debate aspect, isn't there? >> yes. very much so. we're all going to die at some point. we want to have our treatment at such times be consistent with our values, our comfort. we want to spend time with our families and friends. medical care should facilitate that, not stand in the way of it. >> henry aaron, thank you very much for being on the program. >> thank you very much for having me. >>> now, let's get your thoughts, because brings us to tonight's "how you see it" question. in an effort to bring down health care costs, should the u
% by 2050. congress has not yet passed legislation which by make those cuts law in the united states. that is a battle still to be fought in washington. but the administration is clearly hoping that both domestic laws and an international treaty or attainable perhaps within the next year. >> just a note. visit our website for everything you need to know about climate change and the copenhagen summit. there are full details there on the science of global warming, also a summary of the main countries' positions. all that on our website. israel's prime minister has declared a 10-month restriction on new building in the jewish settlements on the best bank, but it doesn't include east jerusalem, and the palestinians have refused to attend taxi unless they stop building on all occupied territory. >> israel's plan is to restrict jewish settlement building on the west bank for a period of 10 months. it is aimed as bringing the palestinians back to the negotiating table. but many in the middle east see this as a cynical move. israel knows the palestinian position well. palestinian leaders hav
to understand the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked, the matters that matter most to our people, nonproliferation, clean energy. these are all issues that have to be part of a joint agenda, and we had a productive discussion about these issues this evening. >> for both countries, ties are critical. japan relies on the u.s. for its security. the you best allies -- the u.s. relies on japan as an ally in an unpredictable area. around this time of year the japanese by could blunt terms. they have been doing these things for centuries. people said it is time for a new relationship with the united states. >> we are gaining maturity and we need more people standing, ying,รง yes, america is not the way. >> i think president obama himself knows we need to respect each other. >> this brief visit is unlikely to resolve the issues between the two countries, including the relocation of a base in okinawa, but president obama is showing that the u.s. still the the use its relationship. >> report from washington over the past few of hours say khalid sheikh mohammed and four other
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
in the united states, significant announcent? >> yes, defitely. there had been a thoht that the president woulrefrain from putting anything psk on the table until the congre had acted. the house has acted if these numbers are in lin with what the hous has in their bill,ut the senate has just reportedded somethg out of comttee. nothing s reach the floor. so by putting h force behin these numbers, the presint is sort of settingp a negotiating line witthe congress and indicating probably what he feels is the minimu benth whenhesenate shouldn't go and a minimum of wt the world neez needs. a warming of three to four degreesahrenheit puts us in the nger zone as far as global warming is concerned, and these sorts of emissions reductions are consistentwith what we need to get od start combatting th warming. >> suarez: professor, ishat mething new for the united stes, specific ars and specific reduction perntages? >> back in the cnton administration, the u.s. did agree to specifiyears and specic reduction perntages, and they were emdied in the kyoto protocol whh president inton never sent up to t
security in the united states. foreign policy is that a zero. these men need to be protected. we may not want to have war, but this has never been declared a war. my ex-husband was a silver star in the marine corps. my fiancee was a captain in the navy. we are allowing this country to look like fools. it has got to stop. military men are trying their best, they need to be protected, we need more troops, and every time there is a news report saying that we are going to make a decision, he is taking too long to make this decision. host: we will have to leave it there. thank you, diane. front page of "the washington post" talks about what is leading up to the speech. "9000 marines beginning final preparations to deploy in southern afghanistan. the marines will be followed by 1000 u.s. army trainers to train the afghan army and police force. the new forces will not start moving until the president lines of both strategies at west point on tuesday. the editors of "the washington post weigh in this morning -- washington post" way in this morning. "if he is going forward to stabilize the co
threat to the united states. >> woodruff: we heard the president say today when the american people hear our rationale, we think they will come along. >> maybe. >> woodruff: that's what he made. >> maybe. a lot of that has to do with the perception of whether the united states can win there and people don't judge the military situation very well. and whether the afghanistan... the people in after dan stan... the afghanistan government can succeed after we've left. there are a a lot of doubts on the part of the public about that. >> woodruff: josh gerstein, pull some of this together. what are the political forces out there weighing on the president? >> here's what i think the basic problem is. it is that we may know by 2011 or 2012 whether the decision the president is about to announce is a success. we may know whether there's better traction for the u.s. mission in afghanistan. we're probably not going to know about the time members of congress face re-election in november of next year. in fact, not all the troops that the president is expected to send there will even be in country by
full circle to what we're doing here today in this important g-8 in the capital of the united states. i feel that a failure to articulate a meaningful, a global jewish identity is the biggest threat currently facing the jewish people. [applause] i want to see our people united, joined by global destiny and mission. a small people, but one that is influential and critical to civilization. we are all here today because ugc, the jewish federations of north america, had created a remarkable network with another organization where we can have communications about identity globally and envision tomorrow and create a stronger jewish future. when we do we can deal with the gall stones -- lies and forgeries. i think in this city they are fond of the expression "yes, we can," but this will take board. do not let this be simply a place for schmooze and catch up with friends and colleagues. we have a larger agenda to address. we must be a think tank to create a vision of jewish people for this century. we're here to create a division. who could have imagined that the jew would one day run at one of
east and the united states did not arm israel in their wars, we never would have suffered 9/11. i do nothing anyone would have heard the name osama bin laden. we are going to be there for years and years. they talk about raising taxes on the ridge to pay for this war. they will be paying for it forever. thank you. host: the first official state dinner will be taking place in washington, "obama was big tent leaves out gop big wigs -- obama's big tent believes that gop big wigs. chief among for those not coming, john maynard -- john boehner and eric cantor. the president did not invite john mccain, even though mr. obama pledged a post-partisan presidency. -- presidency." we will have live coverage of the dinner giving way under -- getting way tonight at 9:00. there is also a press conference that will happen at 11:30 eastern time. the arrival ceremony was originally scheduled for the south lawn, it will be moving to the east room. lester, good morning from detroit. caller: good morning. listen, i do not have any problem with the rich being taxed for this war. over the years, you know,
1 virus... each year, the seasonal flu kills 36,000 people in the united states - hospitalizes more than 200-thousand people... and costs the u-s economy more than 10 billion dollars in lost productivity and direct medical expenses.. experts say if h1n1 becomes more deadly.. there's a potential to see a lot more damage to the us economy. if h1n1 spreads the effect could be greater than we think.. as of august, all 50 states and 2 territories were affected and it could be a rough ride and all businesses need to be prepared. here's what experts say companies should be doing to prepare for the possible worsening of the effects of h1n1 update sick leave policies.. and temporarily forego requiring doctors notes if employees are sick. improve air circulation inside work environments... and have an emergency communications plan in place. still to come the verdict is in on the first major criminal case of the financial crisis... we talk about the impact it could have on any future cases... plus... are small business getting a chance to grow... a look at the lending environment coming up so,
's announcement of a new battle plan for afghanistan in a national address tuesday night from the united states military academy at west point. the military says it could include some 30,000 troops-- a roughly 50% increase in the number of u.s. forces there, but administration officials caution that the president has not settled on a final figure. in his thanksgiving address from the white house, mr. obama offered gratitude to troops overseas and their families. >> we keep in our thoughts and prayers the many families marking this thanksgiving with an empty seat, saved for a son or daughter, a husband or a wife stationed in harm's way. we say a special thanks for the sacrifices those men and women in uniform are making for our safety and freedom. >> reporter: president obama later made calls to 10 u.s. servicemen and women stationed in war zones to give his personal thanks. other nato leaders also are considering sending more troops to afghanistan, including german chancellor angela merkel. officials there were focused today on the forced resignations of the head of germany's armed forces and a
of the united states of america to have that decision made and made as soon as possible. >> still, general david petraeus, the head of central command, says the month-long process has been productive and is almost over. >> there have been explanations and discussions about how the civilian component of this will complement what is done by the work of our military troops. >> by all accounts, afghanistan's government is the weak link in the four strategies the president is now focusing on. >> in the couner is insurgency strategy, the war relies on the eth cassie of the host nation partners, the afghan national police and the government itself. >> the inability to count on some regional governors as partners or to predict a time line for the national government to train enough reliable security forces suggests to some experts a hybrid strategy. >> it's not focused on a counterinsurgency across the entire country but a counterinsurgency in a few key areas, the most violent areas. >> sensible strategy is counterinsurgency involving pakistan as well and the obama administration has set up benchmarks f
that whenever its firepower, the united states is impatient and will eventually go away. a visit to afghanistan reveals both sides of this complicated and ambitious strategy." we want to be more of your reaction to this story about king abdullah -- to this story about the withdrawal of abdullah abdullah. caller: this is a way for obama to disentangle himself from afghanistan under the pretense that we cannot further sacrifice troops in support of a government that is obviously corrupt. thank you. host: the secretary of state had the only response yesterday. israel put forth what the secretary called unprecedented concessions. netanyahu offered them in an effort to restart peace talks, a departure of the administration's earlier criticism of israel. meanwhile, the story this morning is inside a "the new york times." -- inside of "the new york times." "the secretary of state failed on saturday to slow down and not stopped the jewish construction of settlements on the west end. edward, good morning. caller: we need to enhance our relationships with all people. i think that obama should stand up an
states at the end. but this would only be possible if the united nations were able to get to the end. >> been at camp david, five months later, tony blair insisted that the roots to military action should be through the united nations. >> the prime minister laid out the case for a couple hours. he also, at this point, said it might be necessary to have two interventions. >> time and again, mr. blair came back to the same point. >> the prime minister said going through the united nations was absolutely essential. >> so how was that -- how was it when support from the united nations can do nothing that mr blair took the country to war? >> he thought it w the right thing to do. he thought that there were no alternatives. he meant to deal with the disarmament issue. >> so mr blair went the military to investigate options for an invasion nine months before it happened. then, in the aftermath of saddam hussein's downfall, a group in at the white house expected to be like germany and japan at the end of world war ii. sir david left the inquiry having set up the case for tony blair's defense
measure before the united states senate in which no member on this side of the aisle has been consulted in any way -- i would point out to my colleagues historically there has never been a major reform implemented by the congress of the united states unless it's by a -- unless it's bipartisan in nature and i don't believe that the american people want this 2,000-and-some-page monstrosity, which is full of -- which is full of all kinds of provisions that they are either unaware of or even in the study of this legislation many of us have also become unaware of. but fundamentally the bernie madoff accounting, the enron accounting that's been going on with this bill is dependent on envisioning a half a traldz in cuts -- half a trillion dollars in cuts are not attainable. if they are attainable, it would mean a curtailment or reduction in what we promised the senior citizens of this country. it's not acceptable. so what this -- what this -- this motion to commit does, it sends it back to the finance committee. come back with another bill. only this time don't put the cost of it on the backs
, matthew hoh says he has lost understanding of and confidence in the strategic purpose of the united states presence in afghanistan. "is not how ware fighting the war, but why." evan, what you make of that resignation? >> it is disturbing. the state department is not a player out there. i don't know what his circumstances, but they need every state department person taking get out there. the military is running the show, and that is an imbalance. counterinsurgency is as much a civilian, the state department, nation-building thing as it is a military thing, and the military is doing all of it. >> jonathan, anything you on when the president will come to a decision? -- anything new on when the president will come to a decision? >> he is meeting with his advisers on friday. what you are sharing increasingly is mcchrystal lite, which is that he will probably answer more troops into afghanistan, but probably not the 40,000 mcchrystal wants to see. >> charles? >> we are having these debates about the matter of the strategy. at the heart of this is an issue that david brooks raced in the friday "n
in the world. they used to be the united states united states lost that in the financial crisis. last year, china sold 9.5 million vehicles. already this year, 11 million. if it is likely to reach 30 million by the end of the year. the auto show is currently going on in china. car sales are booming, not to sign the big centers, but right around the country. arafat's that stimulus measures will be pulled away -- there are some thoughts that a stimulus asures will be pulled away. >> coming up -- israeli soldiers refused to clear settlers from the west bank. two 0.5 million muslims descend on mecca despite swine flu fears. a sudanese woman who was sentenced to 40 lashes for wearing trousers is in paris to promote her book about the controversy. her sentence was commuted to 1 months in prison, but she was banned from leaving the country, a restriction that she is now openly defying. >> on tour to promote her new book caught. she left secretly to come to paris. the book is called "40 lashes for a pair of trousers." it will not be on sale in sudan. this is why. in july, she was arrested along wi
's. >>> the day at the data states voiced its concern -- the day after the united states voiced its concern about israel bulldozing homes, washington had sharply rebuked israel for plans for 900 new homes in the largely arab region. according to president obama, it could lead to a very dangerous situation. it >> 30,000 people already live here. israel is building new homes and says it will continue to do so. they see it as part of their capital, jerusalem. this is east jerusalem, part of land that israel captured in a war more than 40 years ago under international law. they're not supposed to build on occupied land. as long as it does, say palestinians, they will not restart the stalled peace talks. the palestinian prime minister voiced frustration with the stalled peace process and the is -- and the israeli expansion of settlements. >> it is a question of settlement policy. there is no such thing. there is no such thing when it comes to settlement activity. it either its stops completely or does not stop. >> not israel's building plans have provoked anger and concern across the international com
, born in the united states, a jordanian presence. they are wondering whether he was a crazed gunmen, or whether the u.s. army major had been radicalized by the war's his country is fighting overseas. at the mosque where his -- where he worshipped, a friend disagrees. >> he was a gentleman. very soft-spoken. he was immature. anyone who knew him, they liked him. he liked everybody. i never saw him getting into religious or political conflicts. he was not a loner. >> here, at home, the story ahead. >> we were taken on to the base today, and we talked to one of the soldiers on the same. >> gunshots everywhere. people were trying to move to get to ambulances. >> what are you doing? >> trying to help triage. >> the u.s. is all too familiar with mass shootings, but this one takes place at a particularly acute place and time. it raises a crucial question -- was this the work of a disturbed individual or something more sinister than that? the gunman is in hospital under armed guard. here, they want answers from him, and quickly. matthew price, bbc news, fort hood, texas. >> another shooting
had been shot by hasan. he is a buzz -- he's a muslim born in united states, of born of jordanian presence. they are wondering whether he had been radicalized by the wars in this country is fighting overseas. >> we were taken on to the base today, just after they lifted the lockdown, and here we spoke to one of the first soldiers on the scene. >> you have people trying to move, trying to triage. >> what were you doing? >> just trying to help to secure, things like that. you had so many people moving. >> at the same time, medics and nurses were rushing to help. one colonel told us they saved many lives. >> you could write books about how they took care of these patients. the were lots of lives saved because of my nurses and techs exactly what you do and they did it well. >> police came and went, saying little about the investigation. the suspected gunman is in hospital under armed guard. the army wants answers, and quickly. matthew price, up bbc news, fort hood, texas. >> there has been another shooting in the u.s., this time in an office building in orlando, florida. the gunman ha
the united states to except its demands for direct talks on the regime's nuclear program. it has warned that peon gain will go its own way unless washington agrees. the foreign ministry did not elaborate. the statement was carried by state media, which appeared to be a threat to enlarge its nuclear arsenal. 16 people have been killed in a fire in the central philippines. eyewitnesses say the fire started in the early hours of the morning in a two-story boarding house, and then spread to a sandy area nearby. police and fire may have been caused by a candle. let's turn to business now. you have 25 minutes coming up. a loan provider, cit in america, has gone bust. >> is one of the largest bankruptcy in u.s. corporate history. yesterday they filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. they have about 1 million customers. they long to small and medium- sized businesses. we will see a big impact on the financial markets off the back of this bankruptcy. the financial crisis has been unable to fund itself. one of the big losers will turn out to be the u.s. government. the u.s. government provid
assaulting a child. >>> somali pirates have hijacked a tanker on its way to the united states. a european union spokesperson says the ship was taken about 800 miles from somalia yesterday. it has 28 crew members, none of them from the united states. somali pirates have taken dozens of ships, but this may be only the second attack of an oil tanker. >>> tiger wood sincere talking about a car accident over the weekend, but he's not talking to police about it. rafer weigel has more about that. >> tiger and his wife erks elin, turned away from cops. under florida law, he technically does not have to talk to police. his attorney says, quote, it's a private matter. the accident happened early friday when woods ran his suv over a fire hydrant and crashed into a tree. he did release this statement on his website yesterday which reads, in part, although i understand there is curiosity, the many false, unfounded and malicious rumors that are currently circulating about my family and me are irresponsible. the only person responsible for the accident is me. that's a curious statement, robin. a tabloid
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